Tuesday, December 4, 2007

Neighborhood Meeting

Please come to a neighborhood meeting to organize against the Walgreens proposal.
7:00 pm, Thursday, December 6, in the Fellowship Hall of Guilford Park Presbyterian Church, 2100 Fernwood Dr. at Fairfield Ave. Enter the main office door on Fairfield Ave. and follow the hall to the door at the end.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

We had the same battle with a Walgreens, bank, townhomes and 3 story condos proposed for the corner of New Garden and Garden Lake.
It took 2 plus battles with the board to get this put off.
On the last decision the developer came back and requested a meeting one month later by the board, which is supposed to be not again until the next year.
The developer entended their buy out to the parties that objected the most but was still defeated.
All I can say is keep hitting hard and watch for any sneaky action by the city.......and the developer which happens to be for heavens sake, a council member........

jg resident of Garden Lake Circle

Anonymous said...

How does one get a yard sign to join the opposition? I can't make it to the meeting tonight but would love to show my support in this way...

Anonymous said...

I also would be interested in obtaining a yard sign, but cannot make the meeting.

All of the talk about City Council members being "for development" really sickens me. The development that they are "for" is development that will line their pockets, not development that will create jobs and be good for Greensboro. It is really sickening!

Greensboro homeowner said...

Thanks to those who have stepped forward to get this effort organized to stop the rezoning. Anyone who has driven past that corner knows the plan to put a drug store there is insane - and the blow to the adjacent residential areas would be fatal. Do not underestimate, however, the power of the real estate developers - City Council needs to hear from us, loud and clear.

Erik said...

Does anyone ever stop and think about how backwards our system effectively is, in which neighborhoods must suddenly struggle and organize to STOP a harmful physical reshaping of their own communities (and often losing the battle)... rather than the proposal being vetted by the community FIRST, and only going forward if approved?

Sam Hummel said...

Erik, I agree with you completely. Do you know of any communities that have local ordinances that put community approval ahead of development going forward? Some people would probably say that the zoning board and local planning committees are supposed to represent the community, but clearly that is now how it works. Those bodies are often loaded with developers or developer-friendly folks. Which makes sense because who else would be interested in vetting development proposals from all around a huge city. It seems like there really should be dozens of little citizen boards that vet developments relevant to their immediate area.

Anyway, if anyone knows of a city or county that's developed a less "backwards" development policy/process, I'd be interested in hearing about it. Maybe that should ultimately be the goal of this No Walgreen's campaign: the passage of local development laws that would change it so communities don't have to scramble to oppose development after it is already well on its way. If we could make that happen, it would also benefit neighborhoods that might not have the capacity to organize as quickly and effectively as the Kirkdwood/Irving Park area.

Dottie said...

Get a NO WALGREENS STOP REZONING sign for your yard! Email me at savelawndale.cornwallis@gmail.com with your information and I will get one to you.